[Mesa-users] Grad stellar structure & evolution course

Sean M. Couch couch at pa.msu.edu
Tue Oct 3 09:45:44 EDT 2017


Hi Matt,

I will second Ed’s book on Open Astrophysics Bookshelf. I used it to teach Grad Stellar with HKT as a supplement, but I ended up mostly sticking to Ed’s stuff. I will use it again this Spring for Grad Stellar. I am also planning on adding a few new chapters to it (mostly on massive star stuff!).

Cheers,
Sean


On October 3, 2017 at 9:42:25 AM, Warrick Ball (wball at bison.ph.bham.ac.uk<mailto:wball at bison.ph.bham.ac.uk>) wrote:

Hi Matt,

Ed Brown's book [1] on the Open Astrophysics Bookshelf [2] is laced with
MESA exercises. I haven't worked through it myself or used it to teach
but it's the only resource I know with MESA-based exercises built in.

My usual reference for introducing people to stellar evolution is Onno
Pols' lecture notes [3].

In my previous job, I taught a short stellar evolution course that had
evolution-code based exercises. It was 10 90-minute sessions: 5 lectures
and 5 exercise classes. These were originally developed by a colleague
using CESAM and I eventually ported them to MESA after he left. They're
relatively code-agnostic, though. I can provide the material if you want
but basically the five exercises were:

1. basic solar calibration,
2. making crude isochrones,
3. making Kippenhahn diagrams (without using PGPLOT),
4. solar-like oscillations (partly with ADIPLS) and
5. rotational splittings.

Cheers,
Warrick

[1] http://web.pa.msu.edu/people/ebrown/docs/stellar-notes.pdf
[2] https://open-astrophysics-bookshelf.github.io/
[3] https://www.astro.ru.nl/~onnop/education/stev_utrecht_notes/



------------
Warrick Ball
Postdoc, School of Physics and Astronomy
University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT
wball at bison.ph.bham.ac.uk
+44 (0)121 414 4552

On Tue, 3 Oct 2017, Matt Wood wrote:

> Hi, All:
>
> I’ll be teaching a graduate stellar structure and evolution course in the spring 2018 term. When I taught this last many years ago I used Hansen, Kawaler, and Trimble, which I do like quite a bit.
>
> Before I tell the bookstore to stock those, however, I thought it would be useful to get input from the experts on this list. What book would you recommend?
>
> And since I’m planning on having students learn MESA basics during the course as well, it occurred to me that it would *wonderful* if some in the MESA team actually wrote a book on stellar evolution using MESA for a grad textbook (I know - very heavy lift with little reward on the back end).
>
> This may be off-topic for this list, and I apologize if that’s the case - feel free to email me off-list with your suggestions.
>
> Best regards, and thank you,
> Matt
>
> Matt A. Wood, Ph.D.
> Professor and Department Head
> Physics & Astronomy Department
> Texas A&M University-Commerce
> Commerce, TX 75429
> O: 903.886.5487 M: 903.269.6682
>
>
>
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <https://lists.mesastar.org/pipermail/mesa-users/attachments/20171003/f68fe0cc/attachment.html>


More information about the Mesa-users mailing list