[mesa-users] Question

Max Katz maxpkatz at gmail.com
Tue May 31 13:36:30 EDT 2016


For emacs, you can do M-x toggle-truncate-lines. I have this assigned to a
hotkey in my ~/.emacs file,


(global-set-key (kbd "<f6>") 'toggle-truncate-lines)


which allows me to press F6 on my keyboard and truncate lines (no text
wrap) after opening a text file.

Another fun trick I found after some searching relates to the problem of
scrolling up and down in a column in emacs. By default, if you scroll down
with your mouse or press Page Down, your cursor will reset to the beginning
of the row, which makes it annoying to try and see how a given variable
changes over time. The emacswiki tells you what to add to your .emacs file
to get around this <https://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/Scrolling>,

(defun sfp-page-down ()
  (interactive)
  (setq this-command 'next-line)
  (next-line
   (- (window-text-height)
      next-screen-context-lines)))

(defun sfp-page-up ()
  (interactive)
  (setq this-command 'previous-line)
  (previous-line
   (- (window-text-height)
      next-screen-context-lines)))

(global-set-key [next] 'sfp-page-down)
(global-set-key [prior] 'sfp-page-up)


Note also that in emacs you can do Ctrl+Left and Ctrl+Right to more quickly
navigate across columns.

(Cue everyone reporting in what their personal setup is...)

Max Katz
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Physics and Astronomy
Stony Brook University
http://astro.sunysb.edu/mkatz/

On Tue, May 31, 2016 at 1:16 PM, Aaron Dotter <aaron.dotter at gmail.com>
wrote:

> The most useful single thing I've ever found for reading MESA history
> files and profiles in the terminal:
>
> less -S history.data
>
> from the less manual
>
>        -S or --chop-long-lines
>               Causes  lines  longer than the screen width to be chopped
> (trun‐
>               cated) rather than wrapped.  That is, the portion of a long
> line
>               that does not fit in the screen width is not shown.  The
> default
>               is to wrap long lines; that is, display  the  remainder  on
>  the
>               next line.
>
> And from there you can use the arrow left and right keys to browse
> horizontally through the file.  Changed my life!
>
> Aaron
>
>
> On Tue, May 31, 2016 at 12:02 PM, Bill Paxton <paxton at kitp.ucsb.edu>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Abel,
>>
>> If the problem is that the output file is hard to read because a row with
>> many elements continues on a new line
>>
>>
>> Excellent new take on what might be the problem (I have to admit that I
>> don't know what the actual problem is!).   I didn't even think of that
>> since I never look at the text files (I make plots plots and more plots).
>> But in the rare cases where I do check something in the editor, I can set
>> it so that it doesn't break lines of the file onto separate lines on the
>> screen (same as your nowrap).  Then I simply use horizontal scrolling.   Or
>> if I want to get several values from a row, I'll copy it to a separate file
>> and replace spaces by CR's.  then do the same for the line with the column
>> names and match up names with values.   It might be useful to have a script
>> that would do that automatically, but I don't resort to doing it enough to
>> be motivated to create such a script!
>>
>> Perhaps someone else has a trick for doing this.  But unless you need
>> many digits of output, making plots is the better solution in my experience.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Bill
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On May 31, 2016, at 7:22 AM, Abel Schootemeijer wrote:
>>
>> Hello,
>>
>> (Disclaimer: it is very well possible that I completely misunderstood the
>> problem, in that case please accept my apologies :) )
>>
>>
>> If the problem is that the output file is hard to read because a row with
>> many elements continues on a new line (instead of a one row per line
>> format), you can for example do
>>
>> :set nowrap
>>
>> if you are using vim, to display the file with one row per line, so the
>> elements of one column are displayed right below one another.
>>
>> Kind regards,
>> Abel
>>
>>
>> 2016-05-30 18:05 GMT+02:00 Bill Paxton <paxton at kitp.ucsb.edu>:
>>
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> The final model file contains only the minimum information needed to
>>> specify the structure and abundance.
>>>
>>> The final profile model will have the basics and much more.  So you
>>> probably should be getting the information you need from that.
>>>
>>> Most of the test cases have lines like the following in the inlist
>>> &star_job section:
>>>
>>>
>>>       save_model_when_terminate = .true.
>>>       save_model_filename = 'final.mod'
>>>
>>>       write_profile_when_terminate = .true.
>>>       filename_for_profile_when_terminate = 'final_profile.data'
>>>
>>> The "final.mod" has what is needed to start a new run.
>>> The "final_profile.data" has lots of information about that model.
>>>
>>> Add to your "profile_columns.list" to add things to the profile.
>>> See star/defaults/profile_columns.list for options you can add.
>>> For things not built-in, use your run_star_extras to add your own.
>>>
>>> e.g., you might pick from these
>>>
>>>    ! average charge from ionization module
>>>       !avg_charge_H
>>>       !avg_charge_He
>>>       !avg_charge_C
>>>       !avg_charge_N
>>>       !avg_charge_O
>>>       !avg_charge_Ne
>>>       !avg_charge_Mg
>>>       !avg_charge_Si
>>>       !avg_charge_Fe
>>>
>>>    ! average neutral fraction from ionization module
>>>       !neutral_fraction_H
>>>       !neutral_fraction_He
>>>       !neutral_fraction_C
>>>       !neutral_fraction_N
>>>       !neutral_fraction_O
>>>       !neutral_fraction_Ne
>>>       !neutral_fraction_Mg
>>>       !neutral_fraction_Si
>>>       !neutral_fraction_Fe
>>>
>>>
>>> b
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On May 29, 2016, at 11:22 PM, Liliana Novais wrote:
>>>
>>> > Sorry for my late reply. I need to extract the abundances and
>>> ionizations of the several chemical elements from the final model. I am
>>> trying to understand where it is saved and how it is organized. But am
>>> unable to find it. I can't understand where one starts and the other ends.
>>>
>>>
>>>
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>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and
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>> J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
>> planning reports.
>> https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e_______________________________________________
>> mesa-users mailing list
>> mesa-users at lists.sourceforge.net
>> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/mesa-users
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and
>> traffic
>> patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols
>> are
>> consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
>> J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
>> planning reports.
>> https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
>> _______________________________________________
>> mesa-users mailing list
>> mesa-users at lists.sourceforge.net
>> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/mesa-users
>>
>>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and
> traffic
> patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols
> are
> consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
> J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
> planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
> _______________________________________________
> mesa-users mailing list
> mesa-users at lists.sourceforge.net
> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/mesa-users
>
>
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